• Spartan Training Bulletin | Volume One – Issue One

  • Radio Operations & Maintenance

    Two Way Radio-Walkie-Talkie-Spartan Security Services

    Perhaps one of the most important pieces of equipment our Security Officers, Security Guards, Patrol Officers, Loss Prevention Staff, Event Staff and Public Safety Officers utilize is the 2-way radio, (Walkie Talkie, or Walkie used by our Security Professionals within the film and television industry). Since a typical post or location covers a large area, and has more than one security officer per shift, the radio is an invaluable item which makes any security officer more efficient, productive and safe. 

    There's a lot to be said in regards to analog vs. digital radios however. Even though we at Spartan Security Services are very capable of utilizing either device, depending upon the needs of the client. Nevertheless, digital radios have an obvious advantage over analog, such as the ability to send and receive text messages, and or Bluetooth as well as Wi-Fi capabilities.

    This can prove to be very useful especially during emergency situations, when traditional landlines, and or VOIPs are down. If this equipment is working properly, it can prove to be an invaluable tool to aid with emergency communications, and ultimately save lives if used appropriately. 

    Radio Features: For most Spartan Security accounts we recommend Motorola CP200D (VHF/UHF) Two-Way Radio

    • A digital semi-private line allowing security officers to communicate.
    • Multiple-cannels in order to give security the ability to contact other departments or personnel.
    • Durability to withstand everyday demands or mishaps.
    • Longer battery life then models in the past.
    • Earpiece option if needed to be utilized for discreetness in certain environments.

     Standard Features:

    • On / Off knob.
    • Push to talk button.
    • Volume control.
    • Squelch button.

    Security Sites Locations and or Posts with patrol vehicles and or stationery posts such as Dispatch, and or any type of manned Gatehouse operations, may be equipped with two-way radios with the same basic features as the hand held units listed above. 

    Usage:

    During our onsite training, we advise all our Security Professionals that all two-way Radios are for security related use only, and the security officer should do the following:

    • When transmitting, use 10 codes when possible in order to reduce transmission time and free up the line for other communications.
    • Hold the radio microphone or speaker approximately 4 to 5 inches from your mouth when speaking and use normal voice tones.
    • To speak, depress the push to talk button and pause for a second before relaying information.
    • Always keep your emotions, tone and language in check. (Never use profanity or slang words.)
    • Know what you want to say before pressing the button, to avoid any dead air or time wasted.
    • Wait for a break in radio traffic before transmitting your information to avoid cutting someone off.
    • Only interrupt the non-emergency traffic when you have an emergency to transmit.
    • Keep the volume at an appropriate level at all times and adjust accordingly.
    • Keep the radio with you, and secured to your person via belt clip or holster to minimize the chance of misplacement.
    • Conduct radio check when there's a prolonged period of no communication.
    • Insure spare batteries are being charged when not in use.
    • Address any profanity or any other radio violations promptly, such as an open microphone depressed by mistake, where unwanted conversations are overheard over the air.

     Radio Codes:

    Ten codes were designed to improve the clarity of transmissions while decreasing the overall length of the message without detracting from the content. When used properly, 10 codes will allow for smother, shorter and more fluid radio transmission in order to keep the lines of communication open for any emergency situation that may occur. Use of ten codes, will also serve as a way to keep security officers safe. Example: If security officer(s) are in a location, and do not wish their presence to be known, or conducting operations that may involve physical altercations, and or the security officer (s) does not wish the subject (s) or suspect (s) and or others standing by to have knowledge of what's transpiring.

    The following is a standardized list of 10 codes that is utilized by Spartan Security Services. Each site, location and or post may apply more or less of this list, however it is possible that this list is all inclusive.

    10-1 RECEIVING POORLY
    10-2 RECEIVING WELL
    10-4 ACKNOWLEDGE
    1198 MEET THE OFFICER
    10-6 BUSY, PLEASE STAND BY
    10-7 OUT OF SERVICE
    10-8 IN SERVICE, READY
    10-9 SAY AGAIN, REPEAT
    10-10 ON POST
    10-14 ESCORT DUTY
    10-17 PICK-UP PAPERS AT _____
    10-19 RETURN TO OFFICE
    10-20 LOCATION
    10-21 CALL BY TELEPHONE
    10-22 DISREGARD LAST INFO
    10-23 STAND BY
    10-33 RESIDENT LOCK OUT
    10-34 WELFARE CHECK
    10-34L LEASING AGENT
    10-35 TIME OF DAY
    10-41 AMBULANCE REQUESTED
    10-42 POLICE REQUESTED
    10-56 SUICIDE ATEMPT OR DEAD BODY
    10-70 FIRE
    10-97 ARRIVING ON SCENE
    10-98 COMPLETED LAST DETAIL
    10-100 BREAK REQUESTED
    5150 MENTALLY UNSTABLE

    CODE 2: The situation is urgent, and the Security Officer needs immediate assistance.

    CODE 3: The situation is an Emergency/lights and or siren, all Security Officers and or Management  personnel available must respond.

     PHONETIC CODES (MILITARY & LAW ENFORCEMENT

     C – CHARLIE / CHARLES

    D – DELTA / DAVID

    E – ECHO / EDWARD

    F – FOXTROT / FRANK

    G – GOLF / GEORGE

    H –HOTEL / HENRY

    I – INDIA / IDA

    J – JULIET / JOHN

    K – KILO / KING

    L – LIMA / LINCOLN

    M – MIKE / MARY

    N – NOVEMBER / NORA

    O – OSCAR / OCEAN

    P – PAPA / PAUL

    Q – QUEBEC / QUEEN

    R – ROMEO / ROBERT

    S – SIERRA / SAM

    T – TANGO / TOM

    U – UNIFORM / UNION

    V – VICTOR / VICTOR

    W - WHISKEY / WILLIAM

    X – XRAY / XRAY

    Y – YANKEE / YOUNG

    Z – ZULU / ZEBRA

    Radio Maintenance:

    To insure the radios remain in good working condition, each security officer should:

    • Inspect the push to talk button.
    • Insure radio is receiving and transmitting.
    • Check or fully charged batteries
    • Insure antenna is secure and free from damage.

    Report any discrepancies to the shift supervisor or post commander.

     

     

  • Decision Making Process

    Spartan Security Services - Decision Making

    Six Steps of Decision Making:

    1. Identifying the problem.
    2. Analyzing the problem.
    3. Developing alternatives.
    4. Selecting a solution.
    5. Implementing the decision.
    6. Evaluating the action (solution) taken.

    Identifying the problem: This step can be time consuming and frustrating. You must determine the Who, What, Where, When, Why and How of the problem. You must have all the facts before you move on to the next step.

    Analyzing the problem: Evaluate all the known facts and information. Take into consideration any variables, constraints or limits to your position. Consider the consequences and reactions from the final decision.

    Developing alternatives: Depending on time constraints you may want to consider “brainstorming” with colleagues. Others may have faced and solved the same type of problem.

    Selecting a solution: Consider your personal values, beliefs and standards when choosing your solution and then ask yourself can I live with this choice. Once you have done this one solution may stand out above the rest.

    Implementing a decision: Once a decision has been made take the appropriate actions (i.e. notifying chain of command, documentations, etc.)

    Evaluation action taken: It is important to determine whether or not the solution worked or not, and if so why not? For future reference the actions taken will serve as a standard operation procedure or as an example of what not to do.

    Note: If the solution was a complete failure you may need to go back and re-evaluate each step to find out where the process went wrong. Once the error is found, you will be able to prepare and correct the process for next time.

    Spartan Security Services Staff Writer -